The Structural Basis of Ebola Viral Pathogenesis

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The Structural Basis of Ebola Viral Pathogenesis

Air date: Wednesday, November 06, 2013, 3:00:00 PM

Description: The Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series presents the NIH Director’s Lecture

Dr. Saphire’s lab studies viruses with compact genomes that encode just four to seven genes each. Viruses with limited genomes offer a defined landscape of possible protein-protein interactions. Each protein is critical-many are obligated to perform multiple functions and some rearrange their structures to achieve those new functions. As a result, these few polypeptides accomplish a surprisingly complex set of biological functions including immune evasion, receptor recognition, cell entry, transcription, translation, assembly and exit. Dr. Saphire systematically analyzes the structures and functions of each protein encodes by the virus to gain fundamental insights into the biology of entry, immune evasion, and assembly, and to decipher the collaborative roles of these proteins in pathogenesis. In this lecture, Dr. Saphire will illustrate the molecular function throughout the viral life cycle: how the Ebola virus glycoprotein remodels itself during viral entry and how this remodeling affects the antibody response; how the Ebola and Lassa viruses suppress host innate immune signaling; and how the Ebola matrix protein assembles into one structure to bud new virions and into a different conformation to bind RNA and control transcription inside infected cells.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov

Author: Erica Ollmann Saphire, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute

Runtime: 00:55:40

Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18151

Comments

U Alam says:

I have been trying to search for the answer but have not come up with anything specific.

U Alam says:

would you be able to identify receptor binding molecule that Ebola gp binds to on host cell, like influenza virus gp binds to sialic acid.

Mathavan Muthaiyan says:

Valuable lecture thank you!

offmeds2nite says:

Dr. Saphire rocks my socks :)

Tim Kasey says:

If I were to write 200,000 pages on roads, and not explain anything about driving, would my information be of value to a new driver?  If I were to write 2 paragraphs, giving both: 1) Blood Ph level needed to stop Ebola duplication; 2) Temperature needed to kill the virus;  would my information be less 'vain' than yours? 

Patrick Mwaura says:

Wow what an inspiration!

Meekseek says:

little cheerios, oh my

keine031 says:

Smart confident women are really hot.

alz123alz says:

THANK YOU FOR THE EXCELLENT LECTURE.  WHERE ARE THE BRILLIANT BLACK COLABORATORS? THEY CAN ANSWER THE QUESTIONS THAT YOU NEED ANSWERS. 

Chris Brisson says:

Prediction:  Nobel Prize

Nasiruddin84 says:

Excellent lecture. Thank you.

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