Fighting To Contain Sierra Leone’s Ebola Epidemic

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Into the Hot Zone: NGO’s fight to stem the tide of the deadly Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone

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The deadly haemorrhagic Ebola virus has wiped out whole villages in Sierra Leone. At the epicentre of the outbreak is Kailahun, a town where aid workers are risking their lives to deal with the crisis.

“We are now going to the house, and the volunteers – the Dead Body Management Team – they will proceed with the burial”, explains a Red Cross worker. His boiler suited unit is responding to the unexplained death of a middle aged man. The body must be treated with all the precautions afforded to an Ebola patient. Informing the locals of what is happening to the deceased diffuses tension, and helps to defeat the fear and paranoia spreading among the shocked communities. “There’s a lot of beliefs in black magic and those traditional beliefs, so people often explain things through witchcraft and curses”, says Dr Richard Broome. It is up to brave volunteers and local medics to educate communities afflicted by the brutal disease. With the number of confirmed deaths increasing, it is important to focus on the few survivors who pull through the virus’ 21 day cycle. The individuals and NGOs fighting and dying with their patients are now desperate for a concerted international response.

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Comments

Világjáró says:

All I can say is holy shit

Oz Lang says:

'Bleeding is not a sign of this strain of Ebola.' Correct me if I'm wrong, but from what I've learned about Ebola is that it's hemorrhagic. Well, WTF is hemorrhagic if not bleeding?

LadyUnicorn ???? says:

Despite the fact people want to have proper burials for these people. It's better if they cremate these people, if they leave there bodies just like that… Chances are in the future another Ebola outbreak will return due to have the infected bodies just buried.

cassy pink says:

i wonder who sent the disease to them

xam wuz here says:

XDD IN THE CAR THAT SONG EEBOLLAA ITS DANGEROUS EEBOLLA

abubacarrcoroma coroma says:

This disease make me to abandoned my mother's land Sierra Leone, Those who loose there lives may their souls rest in perfect peace amen. 😢😂😢😂

william xed says:

The West caused Ebola,period.

MustEat Strawberry says:

STOP POLLUTING PLACES IT CAUSES VIRUS AND BAD HEALTH

alz123alz says:

ALL THE YOUNG MEN WHO WAS BRAVE ENOUGH TO DO THE BURIALS TO SAVE THEIR COUNTRY FROM THE EBOLA ZAIRE EPIDEMIC SHOULD HAVE THEIR EDUCATION FOR COLLEGE PAID AND FUTURE SECURED.

GlitchedCobalt says:

people in the future will be in history class like "today we are going to learn about the great Ebola of 2014-2015 in west Africa" just like we are learning about the Black Plague now.

Miss Distress says:

Bleeding IS a sign of ebola, especially bleeding from the GI tract, nose, and mouth–it is a hemorrhagic fever. This kind of misinformation further complicates situations like this, where traditional culture clashes with the unknown, and causing any other type of confusion among people already bewildered is an appalling lack of professionalism.

kye rosendale says:

would a person from a western country with modern medicine, be less likely to die from ebola if they were to get infected due to a stronger immune system?

Bluey says:

The problem is that they touch other people, that's why.

Kevin Worldsavior says:

In any case how would anybody fight the Ebola epidemic without possessing the weapon to destroy the virus the moment it touches us? – I got that lethal weapon and that is the only way on Earth to wipe out Ebola – Eradication of Ebola and guaranteeing Economic Growth is not a problem at all – Ebola and any other viruses like AIDS, Colds, Flues, Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever, SARS, TB, etc. can be killed the moment they touch us, once everybody (kids and adults) start doing the WVD – The Weapon of Virus Destruction – Just an exercise for a minute a day – The most powerful and lethal response to Ebola virus on Earth – Any viruses are killed the moment they touch us – I will disclose my WVD to everyone, if the world pays me 5 billion EURO – Then the Ebola virus crisis will be terminated in just a few days and everybody will be protected 100% from any viruses, the Indian "superbug", bio-weapons (like Ebola, AIDS, Bubonic Plague, etc.), any cancers, diabetes and strokes all the time, all life long – I myself am the healthiest person on the planet – I cannot get sick of any diseases, known on Earth, even for a second.

Lilly Pad says:

I wish there is a way of healing it

Ebola World Wide says:

Too poor to live……

The severity of this Ebola outbreak in West Africa reflects not only the transmissible of virus, but also the sad circumstances of poverty and the chronic lack of medical care, infrastructure, and supplies. One of the consequences of being poor in Africa, especially in a country like Liberia or Sierra Leone, which have gone through a lot of political turmoil and have weak governance and a shortage of medical resources, is that the current outbreak could turn into an epidemic. 
So why eat meat that can kill you….

The term bushmeat, also called wildmeat and game meat, refers to meat from non-domesticated mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds hunted for food in tropical forests.Commercial harvesting and the trade of wildlife is considered a threat to biodiversity.
Bushmeat also provides a route for a number of serious tropical diseases to spread to humans from their animal hosts. Bushmeat is used for sustenance in remote areas, while in major towns and cities in bushmeat eating societies it is treated as a delicacy…

To the foreign eye, it looks like a flattened, blackened lump of unidentifiable animal parts. To many Africans, however, bush meat — the cooked, dried or smoked remains of a host of wild animals, from rats and bats to monkeys — is not only the food of their forefathers, it is life-sustaining protein where nutrition is scarce. 
Rising food prices, another rash of crop failures and the wide-ranging impacts of the global recession, will lead to a rise in the ‘bushmeat’ trade in Kenya, according to international wildlife charity, Born Free. The snaring of wild animals and consumption of their meat, known as ‘bushmeat’, is one of the most serious threats facing wildlife in Africa today…
 
A relic from the Middle Ages

Madagascar, a low-income island nation of more than 22 million people. Since 2009, an average of 500 cases have been reported every year in Madagascar, according to data from the ICRC. 
2013-Madagascar had 256 plague cases and 60 deaths last year, the world's highest recorded number. Bubonic plague, known as the Black Death when it killed an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages, is now rare. During the last 20 years, at least three countries experienced outbreaks of human plague after dormant periods of about 30-50 years…

There are social and cultural factors to consider, as well. In the most recent outbreak, many villagers thought it was the work of a spirit or curse rather than plague, and therefore didn’t seek medical treatment until it was too late. Poverty and illiteracy rates remain high in these areas, and when patients do seek help, it's often in the form of witch doctors or other traditional healers.

Awareness campaigns and ongoing monitoring are therefore crucial going forward, experts say, but efforts have been hampered by a relative dearth of international funding. Plague isn't nearly as common as malaria, dengue fever, or other tropical diseases, and as a result, research and control campaigns aren't as well-funded. Future plague outbreaks could have potentially devastating impacts, especially considering the fragile state of Madagascar's economy and public health system, Just as Ebola is doing in West Africa at the moment..
A new outbreak of Nipah virus has was reported in Bangladesh in 2013, with 24 cases and 21 deaths till 02 April 2013. Nipah virus (NiV) is a deadly paramyxovirus that was first described during 1998–1999 in Malaysia and Singapore, when a large epidemic of fatal encephalitis occurred in humans (283 cases, 109 deaths) Named after the Malaysian village where the disease cross-over from pigs to humans was first discovered, Nipah virus (NiV) was diagnosed in people in 1998 in Malaysia and Singapore, then 2001 in Bangladesh. 

In the past, there was enough room in Africa for humans and wild life to exist without much contact, but deforestation has changed this. Africa was once covered in rain forests, a common habitat for Wild life. During the past decade, loggers have stripped the land, reducing the habitable area for the animals. This is giving more opportunity for a kill virus to mutate from wild life to humans. But animals in the wild are not the only threat to spread these viruses; wild animals — including primates, birds, and reptiles — captured and sold for food or as exotic pets are also a risk.
Research has found that outbreaks resulting from wildlife trade have caused hundreds of billions of dollars of economic damage globally. It has been such a problem the researchers suggested that eradicating the illegal trade market would be more practical and effective at stopping outbreaks than attacking the virus directly. 
Making Glottalization a Force for Good…..

Air, sea and land transport networks continue to expand in reach, speed of travel and volume of passengers and goods carried. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Three important consequences of global transport network expansion are infectious disease pandemics, vector invasion events and vector-borne pathogen importation. 

Less than a decade ago, the biggest problem in global health seemed to be the lack of resources available to combat the multiple scourges ravaging the world's poor and sick.  For the first time in history, the world is poised to spend enormous resources to conquer the diseases of the poor. Tackling the developing world's diseases has become a key feature of many nations' foreign policies over the last five years, for a variety of reasons. Some see stopping the spread of HIV, tuberculosis (TB), malaria, avian influenza, and other major killers as a moral duty. 
Societal and economic factors cannot be ignored. Routes of infection spread are impacted significantly by social and economic factors, with economies characterized by dense populations, high mobility and poor health infrastructure being particularly vulnerable. Understanding and addressing the societal and economic drivers and impacts of infectious disease outbreaks such as the current Ebola outbreak, and taking an integrated approach to disease prevention and control, is essential to managing short and long-term impacts on society.  It is essential to recognize that remote actions or inactions on an infectious disease such as Ebola have a direct impact on all of us society and economy, and as such should be viewed as a World issue.
We owe it to children to make it a better world for them to live in…..
So What is a Virus

A virus is a small infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of other organisms. Viruses can infect all types of life forms from animais plants to bacteria 
Viruses spread in many ways; viruses in plants are often transmitted from plant to plant by insects that feed on plant sap, such as aphids; viruses in animals can be carried by blood-sucking insects. These disease-bearing organisms are known as vectors. Influenza viruses are spread by coughing and sneezing. Norovirus and rotavirus, common causes of viral gastroenteritis, are transmitted by the faecal–oral route and are passed from person to person by contact, entering the body in food or water. HIV is one of several viruses transmitted through sexual contact and by exposure to infected blood. The range of host cells that a virus can infect is called its "host range". This can be narrow or, as when a virus is capable of infecting many species, broad…

An estimated 50 million people caught diseases from animals such as dogs, cattle, chickens and mosquitoes between 2000 and 2005, according to a new study. Some 78,000 of them died. Newly emerging viral diseases are major threats to public health. In particular, viruses from wildlife hosts have caused such emerging high-impact diseases as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Ebola fever, and influenza in humans. The emergence of these and many other human diseases occurred when an established animal virus switched hosts into humans and was subsequently transmitted within human populations, while host transfers between different animal hosts lead to the analogous emergence of epizootic disease.

Too poor to live……

The severity of this Ebola outbreak in West Africa reflects not only the transmissibility of virus, but also the sad circumstances of poverty and the chronic lack of medical care, infrastructure, and supplies. One of the consequences of being poor in Africa, especially in a country like Liberia or Sierra Leone, which have gone through a lot of political turmoil and have weak governance and a shortage of medical resources, is that the current outbreak could turn into an epidemic. 
So why eat meat that can kill you….

The term bushmeat, also called wildmeat and game meat, refers to meat from non-domesticated mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds hunted for food in tropical forests.Commercial harvesting and the trade of wildlife is considered a threat to biodiversity.
Bushmeat also provides a route for a number of serious tropical diseases to spread to humans from their animal hosts. Bushmeat is used for sustenance in remote areas, while in major towns and cities in bushmeat eating societies it is treated as a delicacy…

To the foreign eye, it looks like a flattened, blackened lump of unidentifiable animal parts. To many Africans, however, bush meat — the cooked, dried or smoked remains of a host of wild animals, from rats and bats to monkeys — is not only the food of their forefathers, it is life-sustaining protein where nutrition is scarce. 
Rising food prices, another rash of crop failures and the wide-ranging impacts of the global recession, will lead to a rise in the ‘bushmeat’ trade in Kenya, according to international wildlife charity, Born Free. The snaring of wild animals and consumption of their meat, known as ‘bushmeat’, is one of the most serious threats facing wildlife in Afria today…
 
A relic from the Middle Ages

Madagascar, a low-income island nation of more than 22 million people. Since 2009, an average of 500 cases have been reported every year in Madagascar, according to data from the ICRC. 
2013-Madagascar had 256 plague cases and 60 deaths last year, the world's highest recorded number. Bubonic plague, known as the Black Death when it killed an estimated 25 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages, is now rare. During the last 20 years, at least three countries experienced outbreaks of human plague after dormant periods of about 30-50 years…
There are social and cultural factors to consider, as well. In the most recent outbreak, many villagers thought it was the work of a spirit or curse rather than plague, and therefore didn’t seek medical treatment until it was too late. Poverty and illiteracy rates remain high in these areas, and when patients do seek help, it's often in the form of witch doctors or other traditional healers.

Awareness campaigns and ongoing monitoring are therefore crucial going forward, experts say, but efforts have been hampered by a relative dearth of international funding. Plague isn't nearly as common as malaria, dengue fever, or other tropical diseases, and as a result, research and control campaigns aren't as well-funded. Future plague outbreaks could have potentially devastating impacts, especially considering the fragile state of Madagascar's economy and public health system, Just as Ebola is doing in West Africa at the moment..
A new outbreak of Nipah virus has was reported in Bangladesh in 2013, with 24 cases and 21 deaths till 02 April 2013. Nipah virus (NiV) is a deadly paramyxovirus that was first described during 1998–1999 in Malaysia and Singapore, when a large epidemic of fatal encephalitis occurred in humans (283 cases, 109 deaths) Named after the Malaysian village where the disease cross-over from pigs to humans was first discovered, Nipah virus (NiV) was diagnosed in people in 1998 in Malaysia and Singapore, then 2001 in Bangladesh. 

In the past, there was enough room in Africa for humans and wild life to exist without much contact, but deforestation has changed this. Africa was once covered in rain forests, a common habitat for Wild life. During the past decade, loggers have stripped the land, reducing the habitable area for the animals. This is giving more opportunity for a kill virus to mutate from wild life to humans. But animals in the wild are not the only threat to spread these viruses; wild animals — including primates, birds, and reptiles — captured and sold for food or as exotic pets are also a risk.
Research has found that outbreaks resulting from wildlife trade have caused hundreds of billions of dollars of economic damage globally. It has been such a problem the researchers suggested that eradicating the illegal trade market would be more practical and effective at stopping outbreaks than attacking the virus directly. 
Making Globalisation a Force for Good…..

Air, sea and land transport networks continue to expand in reach, speed of travel and volume of passengers and goods carried. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Three important consequences of global transport network expansion are infectious disease pandemics, vector invasion events and vector-borne pathogen importation. 

Less than a decade ago, the biggest problem in global health seemed to be the lack of resources available to combat the multiple scourges ravaging the world's poor and sick.  For the first time in history, the world is poised to spend enormous resources to conquer the diseases of the poor. Tackling the developing world's diseases has become a key feature of many nations' foreign policies over the last five years, for a variety of reasons. Some see stopping the spread of HIV, tuberculosis (TB), malaria, avian influenza, and other major killers as a moral duty. 
Societal and economic factors cannot be ignored. Routes of infection spread are impacted significantly by social and economic factors, with economies characterized by dense populations, high mobility and poor health infrastructure being particularly vulnerable. Understanding and addressing the societal and economic drivers and impacts of infectious disease outbreaks such as the current Ebola outbreak, and taking an integrated approach to disease prevention and control, is essential to managing short and long-term impacts on society.  It is essential to recognize that remote actions or inactions on an infectious disease such as Ebola have a direct impact on all of us society and economy, and as such should be viewed as a World issue.
We owe it to children to make it a better world for them to live in…..
So What is a Virus

A virus is a small infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of other organisms. Viruses can infect all types of life forms from animais plants to bacteria 
Viruses spread in many ways; viruses in plants are often transmitted from plant to plant by insects that feed on plant sap, such as aphids; viruses in animals can be carried by blood-sucking insects. These disease-bearing organisms are known as vectors. Influenza viruses are spread by coughing and sneezing. Norovirus and rotavirus, common causes of viral gastroenteritis, are transmitted by the faecal–oral route and are passed from person to person by contact, entering the body in food or water. HIV is one of several viruses transmitted through sexual contact and by exposure to infected blood. The range of host cells that a virus can infect is called its "host range". This can be narrow or, as when a virus is capable of infecting many species, broad…

An estimated 50 million people caught diseases from animals such as dogs, cattle, chickens and mosquitoes between 2000 and 2005, according to a new study. Some 78,000 of them died. Newly emerging viral diseases are major threats to public health. In particular, viruses from wildlife hosts have caused such emerging high-impact diseases as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Ebola fever, and influenza in humans. The emergence of these and many other human diseases occurred when an established animal virus switched hosts into humans and was subsequently transmitted within human populations, while host transfers between different animal hosts lead to the analogous emergence of epizootic disease.

Isabella Heisinger says:

journeyman how can i see the whole video please ^_^

Marilyn Smith says:

a cure of Ebola nano silver.

June P says:

101 The Rose, Lancaster PA, hot adult contemporary music…

Elitekiller72 says:

Has black people caused this ?

Fr Louie Goad says:

Revelations: The Fourth Seal has been broken.

Joshua Morrill says:

then they spread the lies about the ground and plants being dangerous by spraying it with water or something, WAKE UP, FREE YOUR MIND, government paid acting, false stories created by them, THE WHOLE THING IS FAKED. learn how the government has been crafting reality for decades with fake news. 

Joshua Morrill says:

all faked news, I like how the pregnant mother is the threat, deliberate mind control, wake up world, "the baby" is not positive with a deadly disease, she looks perfectly healthy, see through the lies. They just did mind control that children are dangerous, It is COMPLETELY FAKE. LOOK AT HOW HEALTHY THE CHILD IS, insanely ridiculous, wake up to see through these lies, I know it is a mind trip :(
 

Michelle 2k16 says:

Hurricanes, nuclear meltdowns, threatens Iraq war and now ebola – pray to the might Jesus! It never too late, have your soul saved🌎👍

Matt allen says:

Dear Africans…….  Don't eat monkeys…….  problem sorted.   Who the hell cares? Its only the arse pit of the world. Let them die like flies.

Melanie Smith says:

UPMC Hamot security guards are now the hospital's first line of defense against the Ebola virus.

Patients who want to enter Hamot's emergency department are asked to describe their symptoms at the department's security station. If they have fever, nausea, headache, diarrhea, muscle pain or weakness, they are then asked if they have traveled recently.

"If they have been out of the country and have symptoms on the (Ebola) checklist, they are escorted right to our triage area," said Ferdinando Mirarchi, D.O., Hamot's director of emergency medicine. "They don't go to our waiting area."

Erie hospitals are preparing for the possibility of treating Ebola patients, even though no Ebola cases have been diagnosed in northwestern Pennsylvania.

Three people from the region are being monitored in Texas for the deadly viral disease after they flew on a Cleveland-to-Dallas flight with a nurse who later tested positive for Ebola.

"We have been having meetings regularly with the (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) about Ebola," said Wayne Jones, D.O., Saint Vincent Hospital's director of emergency medicine. "We have retrained staff on the front end of our emergency department to ask questions about travel and symptoms."

Saint Vincent is in the process of creating a station away from its ER waiting area where patients will be asked those questions, Jones said.

Hospitals should be re-evaluating their procedures for dealing with Ebola patients, said David Dausey, Mercyhurst University's dean of the School of Health Professions and Public Health.

"Ebola is a different type of illness," Dausey said. "Most hospitals are not used to dealing with an acute infectious disease with such a high mortality rate."

The World Health Organization reported that about 50 percent of the people who contract Ebola die from it.

Hospitals are also working with the CDC to ensure their staffs are protected when dealing with patients who might have Ebola.

Saint Vincent will hold a meeting this week to inform staff about ways its parent organization, Allegheny Health Network, is standardizing and strengthening Ebola screening and patient triaging protocols.

Those protocols include training nurses and physicians to wear appropriate protective equipment when treating patients who might have Ebola. That equipment may soon include wearing powered air-purifying respirator suits, known as PAPRs.

"These are fluid-impenetrable full-body suits with a full hood with its own air source," Jones said. "We have them, though we haven't used them."

Mirarchi said he is concerned that hospital ERs will be flooded this fall and winter with patients who have respiratory illnesses like influenza and think they have Ebola because they have similar initial symptoms.

These patients could increase ER waiting times and cause more illnesses to be spread by overcrowding waiting rooms.

"We saw it with the H1N1 outbreak when people were pouring into the ER with mild respiratory infections," Mirarchi said. "People are worried about an Ebola epidemic, but we see a flu epidemic every year. Protect yourself and get a flu shot."

 

DAVID BRUCE can be reached at 870-1736 or by e-mail. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/ETNbruce.

sharonpoetry says:

There must be a cure!

sharonpoetry says:

My heart goes out to the children that died from this disease and the children who became orphans!

Secret For a reason says:

Idgaf what it takes I'm not getting ebola!!! Nope~

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